Hey there! So this is my blog. It's whatever, man. I reblog funny stuff, anime, stuff, whovian stuff, sherlock stuff, and some pagan/meditation stuff. I also love to RP. Go to my 'about me!' to read a little more on me and my blog. :)

I survived: A PSA for those struggling through depression and/or anxiety

I was scrolling through my notes on my iPad because I needed to free space for data and I found this old note that I wrote. According to the document, it was written June 14th 2014. Just this summer and also two days away from my birthday and I wanted to share it with you all.

"Hey, I just wanted to say goodbye. You’ve been a great friend and that means a lot to me. I really can’t explain what I’m feeling right now. Not that you or anyone would care, anyway. It’s just I don’t think any of it is worth it anymore. The pain is just too hard to get through and, try as I might, I just can’t shake off the emptiness. I’ve done all that I could to try to fix things but nothing is working. So there’s only one thing left to do now. I wish you the best of luck with life and I hope you find happiness within yourself and others. Don’t worry about me anymore, I’m not worth it. Goodbye, good luck, and thank you for all of the memories."

For those of you thinking about taking your own life. Don’t.

People care. There are people who love you and would be devastated by your loss. It hurts, I know but something that my mother said to me helped me a lot and I will share it with you in hopes that it will help you too: Yes, life has its ups and down. Yes, depression is a chemical imbalance and it, to a degree, renders you helpless. But at the end of the day, it’s up to you to choose whether or not you’ll help yourself. It’s your choice to stay depressed and not attempt to cheer yourself up in ways that don’t involve taking your own life or self harm.

People. Will. Worry. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. They care. We care. I care.

If I managed to lift myself up from that darkness, I believe you can too.

Notes
1
Posted
14 hours ago

kingschultzies:

♫ im on the highway to heck 

(Source: mssalander, via judyfunny)

Notes
182248
Posted
14 hours ago
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

themetaisawesome:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

tinyredbird:

ceescedasticity:

consultingtimelordfromasgard:

intoxifaded:

what if every single spider in the world was just replaced by a cat
i think that’s a world I would love to live in

but imagine finding a cat in your bath
just a wild cat in the bath
waiting

Looking out the ninth floor window and seeing a giant cat clinging to the glass

Utopia

Would there be different sized cats like there are different sized spiders?

Would there be venomous cats?

"GIVE ME ALL THE MILK HUMAN OR I WILL GIVE YOU POISON BITES"

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

themetaisawesome:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

tinyredbird:

ceescedasticity:

consultingtimelordfromasgard:

intoxifaded:

what if every single spider in the world was just replaced by a cat

i think that’s a world I would love to live in

but imagine finding a cat in your bath

just a wild cat in the bath

waiting

Looking out the ninth floor window and seeing a giant cat clinging to the glass

Utopia

Would there be different sized cats like there are different sized spiders?

Would there be venomous cats?

"GIVE ME ALL THE MILK HUMAN OR I WILL GIVE YOU POISON BITES"

(via witchyroses)

Notes
233330
Posted
14 hours ago

norse-nature-spirit:

whi-sps:

morebeyoncethanyou:

WHAT IS THIS AND WHERE CAN I BUY IT

THINK OF THE WITCHCRAFT

They call it `living sand`here where I live. I plan on buying it, they sell it at the dollar store. :3 I`ve tried it. It`s so much fun you can play with it for hours and not get bored lol. :p

(Source: teknolojimanya)

Notes
260636
Posted
14 hours ago

1800-sex-offender:

"So expensive…" As i whispered to myself looking at the 5 dollar price tag.

(via witchyroses)

Notes
15103
Posted
14 hours ago
shadowelecman:

Teach that asshole bird to fly on his own damn side of the meadow.

shadowelecman:

Teach that asshole bird to fly on his own damn side of the meadow.

(via babygoatsandfriends)

Notes
1515
Posted
14 hours ago

satdeshret:

igamuinacra-merenptah:

emthehistorygirl:

tenaflyviper:

Since the original article has since been deleted (I can’t imagine why…), you can still view it here.

While ancient Egyptians were, by all accounts, black, the fact remains that their civilization was under foreign rule for the last 340 years before its collapse.  There are literally numerous funerary coffins from that time period—different from a traditional Egyptian sarcophagus—that bore portraits depicting the person inside.  These are referred to as Fayum mummy portraits.  They are clearly a departure from Egyptian practices and artwork, and are considered as direct Roman influence, so yes:  There is quite a lot of evidence as to the Greek and Roman occupation of Egypt.

As for Cleopatra, even her name is of Greek origin.  As mentioned above, she was part of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Greek rulers that served as Egyptian pharaohsThe land would be later ruled over by Romans, Arabs, and Muslims.  It is not known who her mother is, but it is speculated that even her mother may have been part Macedonian, and not fully Egyptian, thus putting even the suggested quarter of Egyptian heritage into question.  While both queens Hapshetsut and Nefertiti were of pure Egyptian lineage, Cleopatra was not.

For further reading:

http://www.womenintheancientworld.com/cleopatra.htm

http://www.webexhibits.org/pigments/intro/antiquity.html

http://realhistoryww.com/world_history/ancient/Greek_Period.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ptolemaic_Kingdom

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greeks_in_Egypt

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/regy/hd_regy.htm

http://www.egypt-tehuti.org/articles/greeks-in-ancient-egypt.html

http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/online_research_catalogues/ng/naukratis_greeks_in_egypt/introduction/greek%E2%80%93egyptian_relations.aspx

Or, if you’d like even more information, I’m pretty sure I’ve got a few books around here on the subject…

But seriously:  Please do not make a post about the history of anything unless you are knowledgeable enough about it that you are not presenting a false account of someone else’s civilization.

THANK GOD SOMEONE DID THIS!!! ITS BEEN IRRITATING ME FOR WEEKS!!

Every time I tried to correct it I got so completely and utterly fed up and frustrated I had to turn the computer off.

lets all fact check before we hit that submit button??

I want everything on that shelve.

And let’s not forget that around the beginning of pharaonic egypt, the people were very likely mostly Black, but as time went on and Egypt started trade with other cultures, they had more interaction with other Ancient Near Eastern cultures (hello, Mesopotamians) and eventually Greece and eventually Rome and therefore probably ended up with them being pretty darned mixed in what skin colors folks had. Egypt had more trade with non-african cultures than it did African ones (though there are a couple of African cultures like the Nubians and some others).

There’s a reason that Ancient Egyptian religion and culture is usually lumped in with the ANE category.

Notes
2675
Posted
14 hours ago
thetwistedrope:

holisticsexualhealth:

Gay Men’s Sexism and Women’s Bodies

At a recent presentation, I asked all of the gay male students in the room to raise their hand if in the past week they touched a woman’s body without her consent. After a moment of hesitation, all of the hands of the gay men in the room went up. I then asked the same gay men to raise their hand if in the past week they offered a woman unsolicited advice about how to “improve” her body or her fashion. Once again, after a moment of hesitation, all of the hands in the room went up.
These questions came after a brief exploration of gay men’s relationship to American fashion and women’s bodies. That dialogue included recognizing that gay men in the United States are often hailed as the experts of women’s fashion and by proxy women’s bodies. In addition to this there is a dominant logic that suggests that because gay men have no conscious desire to be sexually intimate with women, our uninvited touching and groping (physical assault) is benign.
These attitudes have led many gay men to feel curiously comfortable critiquing and touching women’s bodies at whim.  What’s unique about this is not the male sense of ownership to women’s bodies—that is somewhat common.  What’s curious is the minimization of these acts by gay men and many women because the male perpetuating the act is or is perceived to be gay.
An example: I was at a gay club in Atlanta with a good friend of mine who is a heterosexual black woman. While dancing in the club, a white gay male reached out and grabbed both her breasts aggressively. Shocked, she pushed him away immediately. When we both confronted him he told us:  “It’s no big deal, I’m gay, I don’t want her– I was just having fun.” We expressed our frustrations to him and demanded he apologize, but he simply refused. He clearly felt entitled to touch her body and could not even acknowledge the fact that he had assaulted her.
I have experienced this attitude as being very common amongst gay men. It should also be noted that in this case, she was a black woman and he a white gay male, which makes this an eyebrow-raising dynamic as it invokes the psychological history of white men’s entitlement to black women’s bodies. However it has been my experience that this dynamic of assault with gay men and women also persists within racial groups.
At another presentation, I told this same story to the audience. Almost instantly, several young women raised up their hands to be called upon. Each of them recounted a different story with a similar theme. One young woman told a story that stuck with me:
“I was feeling really cute in this outfit I put together. Then I see this gay guy I knew from class, but not very well. I had barely said hi before he began telling me what was wrong with how I looked, how I needed to lose weight, and how if I wanted to get a man I needed to do certain things… In the midst of this, he grabbed my breasts and pushed them together, to tell me how my breasts should look as opposed to how they did.  It really brought me down. I didn’t know how to respond… I was so shocked.”
Her story invoked rage amongst many other women in the audience, and an obvious silence amongst the gay men present. Their silence spoke volumes.  What also seemed to speak volumes, though not ever articulated verbally, was the sense that many of the heterosexual women had not responded (aggressively or otherwise) out of fear of being perceived as homophobic. (Or that their own homophobia, in an aggressive response, would reveal itself.) This, curiously to me, did not seem to be a concern for the lesbian and queer-identified women in the room at all.
Acts like these are apart of the everyday psychological warfare against women and girls that pits them against unrealistic beauty standards and ideals. It is also a part of the culture’s constant message to women that their bodies are not their own.
It’s very disturbing, but in a culture that doesn’t  see gay men who are perceived as “queer” as “men” or as having male privilege, our misogyny and sexist acts are instead read as “diva worship” or “celebrating women”, even when in reality they are objectification, assault and dehumanization.
The unique way our entitlement to women’s physical bodies plays itself out is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gay cisgender men’s sexism and privilege. This privilege does not make one a bad person any more than straight privilege makes heterosexuals bad people. It does mean that gay men can sometimes be just as unthinkingly hurtful, and unthinkingly a part of a system that participates in the oppression of others, an experience most of us can relate to. Exploration of these dynamics can lead us to query institutional systems and policies that reflect this privilege, nuanced as it is by other identities and social locations.
At the end of my last workshop on gay men’s sexism, I extended a number of questions to the gay men in the audience. I think it’s relevant to extend these same questions now:
How is your sexism and misogyny showing up in your own life, and in your relationships with your female friends, trans, lesbian, queer or heterosexual? How is it showing up in your relationship to your mothers, aunts and sisters?  Is it showing up in your expectations of how they should treat you? How you talk to them? What steps can you take to address the inequitable representation of gay cisgender men in your community as leaders? How do you see that privilege showing up in your organizations and policy, and what can you do to circumvent it? How will you talk to other gay men in your community about their choices and interactions with women, and how will you work to hold them and yourself accountable?
These are just some of the questions we need to be asking ourselves so that we can help create communities where sexual or physical assault, no matter who is doing it, is deemed unacceptable. These are the kinds of questions we as gay men need to be asking ourselves so that we can continue (or for some begin) the work of addressing gender/sex inequity in our own communities, as well as in our own hearts and minds. This is a part of our healing work. This is a part of our transformation. This is a part of our accountability.


I can’t even begin to tell you how sexist and bigoty the LGBTQ+ community can be. Things like this are largely why I don’t actively participate in it.

thetwistedrope:

holisticsexualhealth:

Gay Men’s Sexism and Women’s Bodies

At a recent presentation, I asked all of the gay male students in the room to raise their hand if in the past week they touched a woman’s body without her consent. After a moment of hesitation, all of the hands of the gay men in the room went up. I then asked the same gay men to raise their hand if in the past week they offered a woman unsolicited advice about how to “improve” her body or her fashion. Once again, after a moment of hesitation, all of the hands in the room went up.

These questions came after a brief exploration of gay men’s relationship to American fashion and women’s bodies. That dialogue included recognizing that gay men in the United States are often hailed as the experts of women’s fashion and by proxy women’s bodies. In addition to this there is a dominant logic that suggests that because gay men have no conscious desire to be sexually intimate with women, our uninvited touching and groping (physical assault) is benign.

These attitudes have led many gay men to feel curiously comfortable critiquing and touching women’s bodies at whim.  What’s unique about this is not the male sense of ownership to women’s bodies—that is somewhat common.  What’s curious is the minimization of these acts by gay men and many women because the male perpetuating the act is or is perceived to be gay.

An example: I was at a gay club in Atlanta with a good friend of mine who is a heterosexual black woman. While dancing in the club, a white gay male reached out and grabbed both her breasts aggressively. Shocked, she pushed him away immediately. When we both confronted him he told us:  “It’s no big deal, I’m gay, I don’t want her– I was just having fun.” We expressed our frustrations to him and demanded he apologize, but he simply refused. He clearly felt entitled to touch her body and could not even acknowledge the fact that he had assaulted her.

I have experienced this attitude as being very common amongst gay men. It should also be noted that in this case, she was a black woman and he a white gay male, which makes this an eyebrow-raising dynamic as it invokes the psychological history of white men’s entitlement to black women’s bodies. However it has been my experience that this dynamic of assault with gay men and women also persists within racial groups.

At another presentation, I told this same story to the audience. Almost instantly, several young women raised up their hands to be called upon. Each of them recounted a different story with a similar theme. One young woman told a story that stuck with me:

“I was feeling really cute in this outfit I put together. Then I see this gay guy I knew from class, but not very well. I had barely said hi before he began telling me what was wrong with how I looked, how I needed to lose weight, and how if I wanted to get a man I needed to do certain things… In the midst of this, he grabbed my breasts and pushed them together, to tell me how my breasts should look as opposed to how they did.  It really brought me down. I didn’t know how to respond… I was so shocked.”

Her story invoked rage amongst many other women in the audience, and an obvious silence amongst the gay men present. Their silence spoke volumes.  What also seemed to speak volumes, though not ever articulated verbally, was the sense that many of the heterosexual women had not responded (aggressively or otherwise) out of fear of being perceived as homophobic. (Or that their own homophobia, in an aggressive response, would reveal itself.) This, curiously to me, did not seem to be a concern for the lesbian and queer-identified women in the room at all.

Acts like these are apart of the everyday psychological warfare against women and girls that pits them against unrealistic beauty standards and ideals. It is also a part of the culture’s constant message to women that their bodies are not their own.

It’s very disturbing, but in a culture that doesn’t  see gay men who are perceived as “queer” as “men” or as having male privilege, our misogyny and sexist acts are instead read as “diva worship” or “celebrating women”, even when in reality they are objectification, assault and dehumanization.

The unique way our entitlement to women’s physical bodies plays itself out is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gay cisgender men’s sexism and privilege. This privilege does not make one a bad person any more than straight privilege makes heterosexuals bad people. It does mean that gay men can sometimes be just as unthinkingly hurtful, and unthinkingly a part of a system that participates in the oppression of others, an experience most of us can relate to. Exploration of these dynamics can lead us to query institutional systems and policies that reflect this privilege, nuanced as it is by other identities and social locations.

At the end of my last workshop on gay men’s sexism, I extended a number of questions to the gay men in the audience. I think it’s relevant to extend these same questions now:

How is your sexism and misogyny showing up in your own life, and in your relationships with your female friends, trans, lesbian, queer or heterosexual? How is it showing up in your relationship to your mothers, aunts and sisters?  Is it showing up in your expectations of how they should treat you? How you talk to them? What steps can you take to address the inequitable representation of gay cisgender men in your community as leaders? How do you see that privilege showing up in your organizations and policy, and what can you do to circumvent it? How will you talk to other gay men in your community about their choices and interactions with women, and how will you work to hold them and yourself accountable?

These are just some of the questions we need to be asking ourselves so that we can help create communities where sexual or physical assault, no matter who is doing it, is deemed unacceptable. These are the kinds of questions we as gay men need to be asking ourselves so that we can continue (or for some begin) the work of addressing gender/sex inequity in our own communities, as well as in our own hearts and minds. This is a part of our healing work. This is a part of our transformation. This is a part of our accountability.

I can’t even begin to tell you how sexist and bigoty the LGBTQ+ community can be. Things like this are largely why I don’t actively participate in it.

(via nornoriel)

Notes
11407
Posted
14 hours ago

rehfan:

chileanboyvstheworld:

God this movie is gold 

And you know that when Bond says “Q” that he’s picturing him in his pyjamas.

What?

(via veevigil)

Notes
153274
Posted
14 hours ago
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